A FINE GERMAN RENAISSANCE SILVER;PARCEL-GILT SATZBECHER OR STACKING BEAKER

Object number : 242

ULM, 1555-1572

MAKER: PETER MILLER,

318 in. (7.8 cm.) high
3 oz. 10 dwt. (110 gr.) Weight

Lit: The maker’s mark is illustrated in E.Maus et al, Goldschmiedekunst in Ulm, Ulm,1990, No. 5, p.26 and M. Rosenberg (Der Goldschmiede Merkseichen, vol. 3, p. 346, no. 4761)

Prov:  THE ROBERT G. VATER COLLECTION

Detailed Description

Cylindrical on spreading foot, the plain body etched with a band of strapwork above moulded rib

This type of beaker with its distinctive bulge to allow the beakers to be stacked and prevent them from slipping too deeply, became notably popular at the end of the 16th century and would have comprised 6 to 12 pieces.

Cylindrical cup on splayed foot, the plain body with etched strap band over molded rib

This type of cup, with its distinctive curvature to allow the cups to be stacked and to prevent them from slipping too far, became particularly popular in the  mid-16th century and comprised up to 6 to 12 parts.

Satz- or stackingbeaker, silver, partly gilded, mid-16th century. The cylindrical beaker is of an appropriate height. Its body is placed over a round, slightly curved base. The upper part of the body is decorated with a Mauresque frieze.

The master most likely used model books for the decoration of the bowl and foot. With a view to this assumption, various model books by well-known copper engravers of the 16th century come into consideration. During the 16th century – and especially in connection with the design of the Mooresques – such motifs were very common among the Greeks and Romans.

The Mooresque decorations shown are both a sign of masterful skill and a careful and detailed production of the cup.