Royal silver, partially gilt seal box for King Friedrich Wilhelm III. of Prussia with the original wax seal

Objektnummer  415

BZ: Berlin 1786
MZ Gebrüder Müller (Johann Bernhard and Martin Friedrich Müller, around 1737 – 80, Scheffler No. 10c, 140),

Diam. 14.5 cm, weight: 332 g.

Detaillierte Informationen

Seal box for King Friedrich Wilhelm III.
Silver; partly gilded. Flat cylindrical box; on the slightly arched lid a cast relief with the monogram flanked by “the wild men” under the Prussian royal crown. The wall with four holes for the sealing cords. Inside a wax seal with the great Prussian coat of arms.

Seal box for King Friedrich Wilhelm III.
Silver; partly gilded. Flat cylindrical box; on the slightly arched lid a cast relief with the monogram flanked “the wild men” under the Prussian royal crown. The wall with four holes for the sealing cords. Inside a wax seal with the great Prussian coat of arms.
Kingdom of Prussia referred to the Prussian state during the reign of the Prussian kings between 1701 and 1918.
The Kingdom of Prussia emerged from the Brandenburg-Prussian areas after Elector Friedrich III. of Brandenburg crowned king in Prussia (→ coronation of Frederick III of Brandenburg). The kingdom consisted of Brandenburg, which belonged to the Holy Roman Empire, and the Duchy of Prussia, which had emerged from the religious state as a Polish fief. The originally Prussian part was given the name East Prussia. [1]
In the 18th century, Prussia rose to become one of the five major European powers and became the second major German power after Austria. Since the middle of the 19th century, it was a key driver of the creation of a German nation state and from 1867 it was the dominant member state of the North German Confederation. In 1871 this covenant was expanded to the German Empire and the King of Prussia took over the office of German Emperor. With the abdication of the last emperor and king, Wilhelm II, as a result of the November Revolution in 1918, the monarchy was abolished. The kingdom merged into the newly created Free State of Prussia.

Friedrich Wilhelm III. (Born August 3, 1770 in Potsdam, † June 7, 1840 in Berlin) from the Hohenzollern family was King of Prussia and Elector of Brandenburg since 1797.
At the beginning of his reign, Friedrich Wilhelm III. a neutrality policy that led to the isolation of Prussia and dependence on France, but also to territorial gains. In 1806 he ordered mobilization against Napoleon, who threatened to crush the Prussian army in the battle of Jena and Auerstedt. The Peace of Tilsit in 1807 sealed the defeat of Prussia with great loss of territory. To strengthen the rest of the state, Friedrich Wilhelm III. the Prussian reforms by Karl Freiherr vom Stein, Karl August von Hardenberg, Gerhard von Scharnhorst and Wilhelm von Humboldt. He hesitantly joined the liberation wars against Napoleon in 1813 with an appeal to My People. After the Vienna Congress in 1815, he ensured the resurgence of Prussia and the recovery of the old areas. However, he did not continue the state reforms, but pursued a restoration policy in the sense of the Holy Alliance with Russia and Austria.
Friedrich Wilhelm III. was considered popular due to his civility and love marriage to Luise von Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Under his rule, the expansion of Berlin by Karl Friedrich Schinkel began.